Innovative And Hazard Proof Architecture

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future-proBuildings need to be designed according to geographic location taking into account a wide range of phenomena such as rains, the wind, floods, earthquakes and other hazards. None of the natural calamities can be precisely predicted and their occurrence leaves a great impact on poorly planned structures and infrastructure. The design of building structures must have comprehensive hazard mitigation planning. With the changes in climatic patterns, weather-related disasters are expected to increase and pose a great risk to mankind.

After Chennai faced one of the worst floods last year, it is time to consider hazard proof and resilient designs for buildings and infrastructure. The city did bounce back to life but care must be taken to avoid and combat the impacts of natural hazards as much as possible. The need for hazard proof buildings and infrastructure even extends to industrial buildings. Industrial architects in Chennai need to focus on several aspects of the structure in order to withstand high pressure, winds, rain and storms. Please check out the below link :-constructionweekonline.in

While Chennai does not have to worry about tornadoes, being located along the coast it has to take into consideration humidity, precipitation levels, cyclones, rainstorms, floods and earthquakes. When a building is designed local building codes must ensure that the design can handle possible hazards in that particular area. Local building codes ensure the safety of the dwellers in the building. In order to protect the structure itself requires other extensive measures. The construction process must be thoroughly monitored to ensure high standards of safety. Existing older homes too must be analyzed to strengthen points of weakness and upgraded to latest safety schemes.

freiburgA geotechnical engineer must be hired to evaluate the project site. They will be able to recommend the best course of action and the foundation the building must be built on. They must be consulted especially in earthquake prone areas to incorporate seismic resistant architecture into the plan.

Being located along the coast, Chennai requires structures that are wind and hurricane resistant. The doors and windows must be impact rated to withstand the wind, flying debris and pressure. Roofs too must be well sealed, securely fastened and such that they prevent windblown water into the interiors.

Floods being a major concern, it is recommended that the structure is built above the water line that is measured by the base flood elevation (BFE), which is the water line of the theoretical 100-year flood. The ground floors especially must be made of durable material to prevent any long standing damage caused by floods. Use of mold and mildew resistant drywall, insulation and avoiding wall to wall carpeting are a few suggestions.

A few architects have learned great lessons from natural calamities and being determined to build hazard proof structures have accomplished these outstanding and unique feats listed here. Listed here are projects that cost a fortune to projects that are low-cost housing solutions for the poor. We could learn from them too.

Structural engineering companies in Chennai specifically specialize in their roles of analyzing the geographic location of a project site and must take the specific measure as necessary to
ensure utmost safety and durability in times of catastrophe. You can find more information at explorecivil.net

Coral Reef Island, Haiti

This is a design by architect Vincent Callebaut after the massive earthquake that shook Haiti in 2009. The design is disaster proof floating houses inspired by coral reefs. The project consists of one thousand modular homes placed in dual wavy stacks that are supported on an artificial pier built on seismic piles. The design harvests energy from the waves, hydro turbines and sea thermal energy conversion. The structure has green terraces.

Barrier, Japan

It is an earthquake proof, soccer ball-shaped structure that can even float as a rescue ship in case of a natural disaster. The 32 sided urethane walled house can be as small as a dog house or a family dwelling, and its surface distributes force and its base acts as ballast to keep it upright if swept away.

Noah’s Ark

This is a hotel designed by Russian architectural firm Remistudio to withstand seismic effects and floods. It has a transparent facade and creates a biosphere that can even allow food production. The green architecture in the design incorporated solar panels and rainwater harvesting methods to supply inhabitants with renewable energy and water. As the name suggests, the hotel rests in a depression in the ground and can come loose and float in case of a flood.

All Seasons Tent tower, Armenia

This tower designed by OFIS Architecture is a cylindrical tower powered by solar energy and looks like a strange man-made volcano. It has a mesh exterior that allows sunlight for temperature regulation. The interiors are protected by a system of concrete cores and the structure has apartments, restaurants, shops, recreational spaces and offices. It is built to withstand earthquakes.

Harvest City, Haiti

This one is another natural disaster proof offshore concept conceptualized by E. Keven Schopfer which is self-sufficient with agriculture and industry. The complex floating modules measure 2 miles in diameter and have 4 zones connected by a linear system of canals. The whole complex is secured by cables along with a harbour city center to the seabed. The concept even uses the debris from the 2009 earthquake as breakwater filler.

Floating shipping container houses, Pakistan

This low cost, eco-friendly design by Richard Moreta is an amphibious container made of reused shipping crates and pallets that rest on a foundation of truck inner tubes that help the structure to float in case of floods. The structure was designed for the millions who were homeless in Pakistan after the disastrous 2010 floods. It can handle up to 74 feet water level.

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